Putting together the team

I saw  my counselor this morning and told her I was thinking of running the marathon. She waited for me to go on, then said, “Wait, you’re not laughing. You’re serious!”

I waved a hand generously and said, “Take a moment to have your reaction…”

It was priceless.

After talking it over a bit, she began to get behind it, rather  breathlessly but with real glee.

I saw my PT just now, for our first conversation since his rather cryptic reply to my email. He doubled my treadmill time (up to 10 minutes from 5), and said without preamble, in his cooly unflappable way, “That marathon idea of yours? It’s going to be slow, it’s going to be hard work, but I think we can do it. It’s a good goal.”

I nearly burst with relief and delight.

He set a 5-mile limit on my exercise over the coming 2 weeks of my vacation, then checked and said, “You’re  going to come back and say, ‘He-e-ey, I did 15!”

Finally… a PT I don’t have to train.

Last, I saw my rheumatologist, who laughed in a pleased fashion and said, “I’m glad you’ve got a good PT for this. That makes my job a lot easier.” Didn’t turn a hair.

I’m seeing my primary care doc and my pain doc on Thursday.  As for data (I am a geek; gotta have data!) I have current baseline levels for all basic chemistries, immune globulins, and a complete blood count, plus vitamin C and D. I have cortisol reports from when I was in adrenal exhaustion.

I’d like a baseline cortisol test now, and talk over what other stress/adaptation/compensation markers we could be tracking and how often.

I might have to shop around to different labs to keep in budget, if insurance can’t be persuaded to cover the lab-based data collection, or if I can’t get it covered some other way.

I’m dead serious about not hurting myself. I’m also dead serious about going for this. In any case,  we might as well collect data, so if nothing else, we’ll have one damn good case study to publish.

See you on the trails.

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Marathon — second thoughts

I’ve gotten some interesting responses to my marathon proposal, some of them very worried, bless their excellent, loving hearts. I feel I owe some explanation.

My tiny handful of fellow “imps of the possible” are all for it, completely understanding the uncertainties and sidetracks and possible (even probable) different endings in store – and knowing that it’s the reach that’s important, that spreading

Making progress

Yesterday was my first workout: walking 0.8 miles around the block. I live on the side of a pretty steep hill, so that’s not completely trivial.

On the steepest part, I wanted to stop, but my old athletic training kicked in: do anything *but* stop, because it’s worth it to get the hill behind you. So I moved forward less than one foot-length at a time, giving the sick feeling in my chest enough ease to pass. (At least I know it’s not a heart attack. One of the wonders of chronic CRPS is, your physical experience of life has changed so much that words don’t exist to explain it. But I know for sure it wasn’t a heart attack.)

Today was my second: the same distance, but noticeably better – on the steepest part, I could maintain something close to a walk, and I never got that sick feeling in my chest.

Wonderful progress!

Today was also my first lesson in biofeedback. I thought I was hot stuff, because I can knock 10 to 12 points off my blood pressure at will. Today, though, we measured galvanic skin response. It’s much more subtle, and a lot harder to finesse. I got compelling evidence that the physiologic back pressure of this disease is pretty much as bad as I’ve ever said it was. I won’t go into that, because it’s depressing.

I’ve been thinking about a blog entry on breathing, the simplest and most profound of our daily actions. I have to absorb today’s lessons first… I really see why I haven’t been able to put it together yet, even though it’s been on my mind for weeks. Breathing, like living, is so fundamentally simple that I have to think it through very carefully before I try to put it to words.

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Letter to my PT – how about a marathon?

Dear [PT],

Something crystalized in my mind, after reading the preface to a friend’s book. (On Kindle here.)

I  do well with having rather demanding overarching goals. (Trauma nurse at DC General, software geek at Borland? yeah :)…) I have some good mental and creative goals (books on mythology and CRPS neuro-endocrine-immunology, 501c3 called “CRPS: Art and Spirit”, etc.), but my physical goals are reactive rather than proactive

Right now, it’s all about beating back the assaults on my function; there’s none of that necessary “F.U.!”-sized stuff on my horizon that can help me bring enough focus and determination to vault over such paltry issues as washing my damn hair. (One side of my face laughs wryly as I say that.)

There’s the shorter CRPS walk/roll/run in December, Quench the Fire!, and that’s a good, reasonable goal.

I need a slightly unreasonable goal, or I can’t really focus. Normal goals really do bore me. Sad, possibly warped, but true. 

And this reactive mindset is doing me no good at all — look at my last stallout. Awful. 

It’s just awful to be reactive in my goals, and especially in the goals for my horribly challenged physical self — my only vehicle of life. 

I have to do better. 

I need something more — something a bit larger than life to strive for. (Just ask my mother. I’ve been like this since I was at least 2.)

So… I’m considering running next year’s marathon.

Positives:

+ I have a year to pull myself together. If you could help hook me up with some kind of structure for training, so much the better.
+ Keck staffs the medical tents, which I find automatically reassuring.
+ It’s slightly crazy, but not completely insane. Perfect.

Negatives:

– Mostly pavement. A real problem. (I don’t have to train on pavement, though.)

– Potentially difficult, risky and expensive. …Just like life.

– Ummm…

I think the Ayes have it. What do you think? And, if I’m in town, I’d be delighted to do the 5/10k at the end of this year. Not as a goal, but as a coincidental benefit.

It’s all about pacing.
I realize we’ve only just met, and this might strike you as brash or ill-considered. I’m not saying it isn’t, but it’s very much in character and, with a little bit of faith from those backing me, could be just the mental kick to help with quite a few intermediate hurdles.

And, of course, I might finish.

(With a little publicity, this could be pretty cool all around. Fat, brittle, middle-aged, chronic CRPSer turns marathoner. — Huh, that gets MY attention! And how cool if I was not the only one….)

I used to be a middle-distance runner, going 4 miles up and down a canyon or 6-10 over surface streets, 2-5 days a week. I kept getting back to it, pre-injury; I enjoyed it, and looked for places to live where it was safe to run.

Marathoning is a different mindset, but I think it’s learnable. And learning to do a marathon in a paced, calm, controlled, ANS-managed, non-frantic manner… well, that’s one hell of an F.U. to CRPS!

I look forward to hearing what you think about this… I think 🙂 I really do want your advice and would love to be able to check in with you as I go, so please mull it over. I’m seeing my whole team next week, so I’ll get to do plenty of hashing-out. I’ll blog it and talk it over with some of my old guard this weekend, too, so I’ll be better prepared for our conversations.

Many thanks,

Isabel


Writing on science, adaptation, surviving, and running…
* Health and Life with CRPS-1: http://livinganyway.blogspot.com/
* Cauterizing the Bleeding Edge of medicine and science: http://biowizardry.blogspot.com
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