First aid kit – homeopathic side

I’d like to eschew certain arguments altogether. This is not about dissing or justifying one approach over others. Every one of us has to figure out what works for our own individual selves. Anybody who feels they have the right or duty to argue otherwise, please read the last 3 paragraphs first. Thank you!

My homeopathic first aid kit

I used to keep just Arnica montana and Symphytum officinale around. As an old trauma nurse & athletic over-doer, dealing with sprains, bruises, and occasional bone bruises & minor fractures was the main point, and these two remedies are outstanding.

Then Zicam became over-the-counter shortly after Oscillococcinum hit the market during flu season, followed a year or two later by the blend Cold Calm, and winters got a lot less snurgee. So that was another win. It was interesting to finally care whether a virus came on fast or slow, because until then, it didn’t matter, because I was in for 10 to 14 days of aching yukiness either way. (Generally speaking, if it hits fast, it’s flu; if it comes on over a day or three, it’s a cold.)

It was good to be young! And healthier! XD

The current cabinet

Now I’ve got a lot more to deal with, including lower and fewer possibilities for meds, herbs, and food. Homeopathics are taking up more of my “treatment options” space as other things fall away and conventional therapeutics have less to do for me.

Here’s my current lineup:

Pain

Body pain: Arnica, 6c or 30c, or both starting with 30c and going down.

Bone pain*: still evolving this solution. Currently isolating effects of Symphytum o.(absolutely brilliant for previous fractures and bone aches in early CRPS) vs. Bryonia (commonly used for my type of bone pain) vs. Calcarea flourica (helped with aching bones 15 years ago, on occasions when Symphytum wasn’t helpful.)

Muscle cramps and spasms: Magnesium phosphorica, known as Mag phos by its many fans, 6c for pre-spasm tension or sudden onset, 30c for deeper or more persistent cramping.

Labeled as a remedy for menstrual cramps, I have found it to be outstanding for my skeletal muscles and intestinal muscles as well — as long as:

  • My serum magnesium is ok (I supplement with chelated magnesium twice a week, since my body plows through this electrolyte at a consistent rate);
  • My other electrolytes are ok, including calcium, and my vitamin D is high enough to regulate the calcium properly;
  • My hydration is adequate. If I can’t experience thirst normally, I blink and feel for discomfort in my eyelids, or pinch up the skin on the back of my hand and give it 1/10 of a second to return to flat. (I need to stay in the upper level of hydration for the sale of my brain & spine — as well as my kidneys, which work hard to deal with my meds.)

Note of caution: Muscle spasms are not necessarily a simple fix. Start with the simple thing and work out what your underlying tendencies are: dehydration is usually easy to sort out, and you’ll know if it helps within a day; magnesium/calcium/electrolyte levels need a simple blood test to discover; once you’ve got good info to work from, you’ll know if your next step is supplementation, medication, homeopathy, or a call to your doctor.

So, please, start with getting good objective info so you know what your particular system is likely to need when your muscles cramp. There is definitely such a thing as too much dietary magnesium, so throwing magnesium chelates at spasms can make things considerably worse if that’s not the underlying problem!

G.I.

Colic & abdominal cramps: Mag phos for the win! See above.

Constipation: As I’ve recently been reminded… first, call your pharmacist, and ask about your med side effects. Sigh, so easy to do, so hard to remember to do.

Homeopathically, Sepia and Alumina took turns being helpful, but didn’t complete the turnaround I needed.

In the end, getting off a key med, while also minimizing histamine release in my gut, while also supporting digestion with a prescribed suite of digestive enzymes and some Chinese herbs, while also eating tapioca with nothing in it but a bit of coconut sugar nearly every darned day for 6 weeks… turned that intransigent problem right around. Plus, Mag phos for the abdominal cramps.

This is a 5-star example of a multi-front approach: med revision, diet revision, toxicity reduction, and a combination of supportive measures: prescription, dietary, herbal, and homeopathic.

Life, at this end, isn’t simple. Simple solutions often aren’t enough. That’s why I value the “multi-factor” approach: nothing works that well in isolation, so I often wind up getting everything possible to head in the desired direction.

Brain

“Heated” brain feeling & stormy sensory sensitivity: still best with herbal concentrated lemon balm, which is effective & reasonable. Good homeopathic fallbacks (for me) are Silicea or Kali phosphorica, depending on accompanying feeling of irritability (Silicea) or dullness (Kali phos.).

*Bone pain treatment note: The bone pain started up as Savella cleared my system. My bowels got back into gear over the same span of time. This week, I trialled a small dose (12.5 mg twice daily) of Savella to see what it did; in 2 days, the bone pain decreased by ~80% — and my bowels shut down at the same time, leaving me with the poor sleep, delayed recovery, body pain, and joint pain that comes with the inflammatory bloom that produces.

I might give it one more shot, but honestly, there was no other change involved and I hate torturing myself.

I’ve learned what it’s like to survive without a working gut,  and it’s too hard. The knock-on effects of pain, fog, and allergic activity is brutal.

So, my current personal project is to figure out another way to manage bone pain. It’s just awful, but a stalled gut is still worse.

Diet and nutrition has brought me a very long way forward, but at the moment, there’s not much more it can do. I’ve had a squeaky clean diet for years, but now it’s so carefully tuned it could probably hit high C. This may change, and if I have to do something else, I’ll figure it out when the time comes.

Pharmaceuticals have come a long, long way, especially these amazing mixed-SNRI neurotransmitter supporters. However, between my genetic tweaks affecting med assimilation and the natural effects of biochemistry, there isn’t an obvious way forward here, now that Savella has washed out for me.

Herbs are so built into my life that it’s a specific mental effort to think what else I could try here. Given that herbs A. Require frequent dosing and B. Do have side effects and I’m exhausted with side effects right now, that currently there’s nothing herbal I know of that I’m willing to try.

Homeopathics have a history of being more predictable, consistent, reliable, and safer for me than herbs and pharmaceuticals (though I owe my life to pharmaceuticals and am not dissing them, just facing another tough reality). There are several possibilities to explore, so that’s where the next step leads me.

Onward!

Felix the Cat with bag of tricks and scientist

Last 3 paragraphs

My own approach is absolutely comprehensive — pharmaceutical, nutritional, dietetic, physical, psychological, mental, herbal, artistic, behavioral, and energetic techniques all play a part, and there’s peer-reviewed science behind over 90% of what I do. Every single intervention gets tested on me — and assessed for benefit and drawbacks — before being incorporated, and gets retested at least yearly.

I’m a diligent empiricist; as I’m responsible for exactly 1 clinical case, that is the most rational approach. Empirical science is the only method of scientific inquiry which consistently considers the individual case.

Sarcastic Sister adds:

Anyone who sincerely & totally refutes the value of homeopathic remedies is welcome to borrow my body for a week or two & see what works for themselves; I’d be happy to borrow theirs while they figure it out.

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New set of wheels

I walk everywhere I need to go. I finally tried the bus, and honestly, it could have been worse — but the base of my spine is still not prepared to put up with more than about a mile of that banging.

The problem with walking is that my legs are getting really good at “Burning Bones” — one of those trippy CRPS nerve games where it feels like the bones themselves are covered in & consisting of fire.

I used to wonder what burning bones were like and felt lucky for not having experienced it — and highly inclined to keep hammering massive doses of D3 to keep my blood levels in normal range. (D3 helps keep calcium in the bones & teeth, where it belongs, and prevents excess calcium from causing nerves to misbehave, among other things.)

Well, this clears *that* up! I know exactly what burning bone pain feels like now. But still, I’m well aware it could be so much worse: I just get little yellow flames, not big blue-based barn-burning flames. Those are definitely worse. I don’t know if I could keep walking through big blue flames.

Do I walk through the little yellow ones?

Go on, guess.

Shows woman flat on floor, with woozles coming out of her head
Creative Commons share-alike attribution license, credit livinganyway.com.

Carrying the bag I use as a purse adds a few pounds to the load on my legs, hips, and knees, and a bag or two of groceries adds about another 10-12, however carefully chosen they are for weight.

Plus, I’ve been slinging those from my shoulders — better than a backpack, which puts the stress right across the anterior nerve plexus for the shoulders, but — as we say about little yellow flames for bones — is, um, less than ideal.

I have tried every grocery cart conceived of in the last decade. The vibration on my hotwired palms is like hanging onto a working jackhammer covered in razorwire. (I don’t recommend doing that, however much you want to see what this is really like.)

I stared longingly at jogging strollers all year.

I designed my own grocery conveyance, priced the parts, and realized I had just designed a jogging stroller and it would cost about as much.

I haunted Craigslist and Freecycle for weeks, until an add for a Schwinn jogging stroller popped up.

Shows cupholder bracket affixed to handle of stroller

Is that a cushy push or what? 😀

And, guess what, it has pockets! — I mean, cupholders! (Cupholders are definitely the pockets of non-clothing items, say I.)

For once, I kept myself from saying *just how much* this means to me and why, because who wants to hear sob stories, right? I handed over the very reasonable sum, thanked him 4 times but not nearly enough, and sailed away.

Even though my legs are starting up the burning bones awfully quick today, in every other respect I feel like I’m walking on air.

I can pick my own *groceries*! OMG!!! And *get them home* with minimal further damage! WOOHOOO!!

Life is good.

Thank goodness for that sweet family who let this go ❤, and for craigslist.org for linking our complementary needs.

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The freedom of masking

Two years ago, if I were walking down a sidewalk next to trucks belching diesel, I had to breathe shallowly and mentally plan on the nausea and neuro-huckery that was likely to follow.

When I went shopping at Big Y — well, I couldn’t, because the massive bakery displays at both ends of the store could wipe me out in a heartbeat. 

I was sadly giving up my Goodwill/Salvation Army pillaging habits because the unquenchable stench they saturate the stuff with made me so sick it was harder and harder just to walk in there, and my de-stinking magic stopped working on fabrics. Sad sniffle… I used to get half my furniture from there, and most of my better clothes.… 

I considered getting surgical masks, but I already knew how many leery looks & disparaging comments that public mask-wearing used to provoke. I try to avoid getting leery looks, because people are a lot less likely to be pleasant or helpful towards someone they’re leaning away from.

Then The Modern Pandemic hit, and everything changed.

Nearly two heartbreaking and traumatic years later, the message that this is the new reality is starting to take hold; testing and explanations of what makes a mask effective is available from legitimate labs and reputable sources; and I’ve made myself 2 custom-fitted, Isy-safe, well-made masks that are easy to clean and dry well overnight. 

Colorful though they are, they just don’t stand out any more! Masks are part of the New Normal, and generally provoke smiles and friendliness instead of the opposite.

So, on today’s walk, I wound up surrounded by fuming traffic — and put my mask on. No problem. Then I went shopping at Big Y and went from end to end of the store — with my mask on. No problem. I was too tired to go to Goodwill today, but when I do go there, I put my mask on — and I don’t smell a thing until I get everything well outside and take my mask off. (I can still get the smell off of hard-surfaced things.)

Mind you, it’s not like my own breath is a bucket of roses (!) — but it still smells way, way better than diesel, and it doesn’t make me sick! 

It took awhile to realize it, but masks really set me free and make my *whole* world (not just the pandemic aspect) much, much safer and more comfortable to be in.

 

 

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Wholeness is order

Many people have figured out before me that approaching life coherently, as a complex creature with inward & outward lives, as physical and energetic beings at once, and so on, is probably a really good idea.

I’ve spent years describing myself as a “text-based life form”, and “better in print than in person.” That was useful for a time; most of us need something to cling to, to carry us through, when we feel terribly broken.

This summer was transformative. I started it wholly committed to making my legacy; I’ve come out of it realizing that I’m very much alive, and that, if I’m going to get anything done, it has to be as a whole person — minding my relationships with those who can relate to me, minding my physical care as a loving duty rather than an intransigent puzzle, tending my crafts as sweetly as I need to be tending my recuperation, and so on.

Somehow, I’m absolutely certain that only in this way — and not in the head-first, head-down policy of my old working self — only in this way can I make meaningful progress.

Of course, that means it’ll take longer up front. But, as an old mariner, I’m well aware that prep is between 80 and 90% of the final result — so you take the time and do the prep, if you want good results.

I happily think of star nurseries (thank you, NASA , for this image), which look like glorious messes — but, from these, galaxies are born.

Logical? Well, not in any linear sense. Organically it works, though.

 

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Seat-shaped rock in a shallow stream.

The Place to Be

On a rock in a river

Clean quiet murbles and shushes

everything Not Me drawn gently off

So easy.

 

Skeeters drift on, slackjawed with peace.

Dogs huff and slosh in the shallows,

Just going by,

In furry certainty

That happy playtime is normal

And right.

 

White white aspen tickles

Blue blue sky

And the birds zip

& comment benignly

up there.

 

The wet scent

Of contentment

Soaks to my marrow

And I’m finally

 

Still.

Seat-shaped rock in a shallow stream.

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Active presence

I love the term “radical presence” because it feels radical to jump the barrier of overwhelming emotion to land face-to-face with the moment and be able to look straight at it regardless. However, in practical terms it’s the opposite of radical — it’s conservative in the classic sense, because it puts us back into the realm of what’s demonstrably real and solid.

Therefore, conservative presence is the same as radical presence.

What a wonderful object lesson in putting political branding aside.

However, for the sake of clarity, I think I’ll start calling it “active presence”, as it usually takes an act of will.

When I was working as a nurse, an important part of the job was teaching people what they needed to know in order to go on better: dress the wounds, improve activity, improve nutrition, manage impaired systems (immunity, pain, respiratory), take care of relevant organs (heart, liver, pancreas, kidneys, gut, brain) and so on.

I’m sorry to say I was too idealistic at first and found myself being scoldy. The word “should” showed up a lot; worse still, “shouldn’t.” Argh! Words I’d love to take back!

I finally learned the key principle of teaching & training around life skills, especially primal ones like eating/drinking/moving: people have to start from where they are, not from where anyone, including them, thinks they should (ugh) be. The ideal is not relevant, only the real.

The first step, therefore, is to find out what that reality is, no matter how egregious. Their best hope of improvement is almost always in small, manageable steps, starting right from their current reality.

This led me to my first understanding of active presence: change has to start from this eating habit, this activity level, this degree of self management. No others exist yet! Trying to pretend they do only builds castles in the air.

However, I’ve seen patients of mine go, for example, from couch potatoes with snack-stocked shops and triple-bypass heart attacks to organic-grocery-owning half-marathon runners in a couple of years, by starting with tiny stepwise improvements: cardiac rehab class, to slow walks, and on up from there.

woman walking up beach, looking totally at home in her skin.

There are no guarantees (it’s easy to joke about people with great life habits getting hit by a bus) but hydration, nutrition, fresh air, and exercise tend to pay off tremendously– usually after a clunky adjustment period, as body and mind lurch through the initial changes.

Of course, the time that new habits take is going to pass anyway. Would you rather be reaping rewards at the end of it, or find yourself back in the rut that put you into medical care?

I’ve said exactly that to many people, with honest attention. This isn’t a trick question, nor is it an occasion for smarm. It’s a key question we all have to ask ourselves periodically throughout our lives, in one way or another. Everyone has the right to contemplate and answer that question honestly, even if the real reaponse is, “I like my habits/my rut, I see the trajectory, I know where it will take me, and I accept that probable outcome with open eyes.” I’ve had people say that, in tones varying from sweet concern for my feelings to roaring defiance. It’s all okay; it’s their call. I’d ask if they’re interested in cushioning their fall or minimizing damage to others, tailor suggestions accordingly, and then call their physician to adjust expectations and ask about/offer any ideas for mitigation over improvement. (It was never a total surprise to their doctors.)

As a patient, I have made — and continue making — complex changes in order to stay as well and functional as possible. I’m persistent like that. To me, being incapacitated is intolerable. I’d rather have better options.

“When you’re alive, anything is possible. It’s being dead that seriously limits your options.”
– Jodi Taylor

Active presence puts me on ground firm enough to step off from, and actually get somewhere. I’ve been living with a strong inward nudge to simplify, focus, and hurry up, because I don’t have much time left. It may be fallacious (I hope so), my subconscious working to override my “completion anxiety” about larger works. Given the accuracy rate of these deep, strong inward messages up to now, I’d be a complete idiot to ignore it. So, I’m simplifying, focusing, putting my ego (which is where this anxiety resides) off to one side, and buckling down on building the structure of my legacy in my head. I’ll discuss that more when there’s some output.

Dying is horrible. I don’t want to do that, ever. I’ve started to, a couple of times, and I’ve seen far too many loved ones go, especially those with these diseases. No words, no words for it… That said: Being out of this relentless, grinding circus of delicately-balanced tolerability, with horrific and likely further life-limiting consequences for certain mistakes? Really looking forward to being done with it! There will come a time — at some point, for me as for anyone — which will suck, and shortly after that, I’m absolutely certain there’ll be an end to this (extremely well-managed) biological terror and the unimaginably cruel pain that drives it.

I have this stubborn inner nudge that it’s not far off for me personally. That’s definitely NOT my choice, it’s the circumstance I find myself in. Without having wanted or chosen it, I somehow find acknowledging it to be hugely freeing!

That is intensely weird, I know. Also uncomfortable and maybe bitter and sad.

But that’s what is true for me, right here and right now.

From here, and only from this point in my often tortuous reality, can I move on.

I accept that.

Here I am.

Time for the next little step. Who knows where it’ll take me in the long run?

Let’s find out.

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Angel wings & tactical things

This morning, I woke up feeling like a butcher knife was lodged in my heart, the memory of barking and snarling voices ringing in my ears. No surprise there; it’s to be expected.

My first coherent thought was, “This needs to be better.” I think that about a lot of things, but this one is mine to deal with.

I pulled one of my tools out of my mental toolkit, and flicked my eyes from ceiling to floor, ceiling to floor. (I’m a side-sleeper.) When I felt an urge to close my eyes, I did. When I opened them again, the butcher knife had shrunk to the size of a stiletto, maybe a medium-sized knitting-needle.

This magic technique is one way of using “bilateral stimulation.” Bilateral stimulation is a way of using neuro-anatomy to manage neuro-chemistry, using your brain signals to heal your mind. There’s loads of material on it in the field of trauma psychology.

Basically, the way our brain processes “sidedness” (the fact that we have a left, a right, a front, and a back) is even deeper than the way it processes strong, primitive emotions, like fight-or-flight-or-freeze. Those emotions tend to disrupt the brain’s normal processing of memory, thought, and decision-making, which can be useful when mastodons are stomping over your village — what you need to do is move faster than you’ve ever done in your life, and not camp on their migratory route in the future.

Most decisions we have to make are not on that order. Even when we live with a brain that keeps wanting to go there, it’s still rarely useful. So, it’s wise to have a few tools that can keep it in check when it’s working “after hours”, so to speak.

One way to do that, which works for most ordinary stressors, is meditation. It gives me practice in creating a still space inside, where I can survey my surroundings, assess things, and choose the best way forward, from this non-triggered space. The “success” of individual meditation sessions is irrelevant to this skill, because it comes naturally as a result of persistently going back to meditation and working on it over and over. Like with many things regarding central nervous system care, persistence is key.

When my skills are toppled over by what goes on around me (cf. my last post! A perfect example of losing it and coming back again), these other tools come out of my “bag of tricks.”

Glancing from one side to another is easy, portable, and requires only some vision and muscular control of your eyes. Pick a spot about 45-60 degrees ahead of you on your left, and a corresponding spot on your right. Flick your glance from one to the other, and back again, not too fast, not too slow. The right speed varies from person to person and time to time. Feel out the point where your system naturally drops to a median, attentive level. It doesn’t feel dramatic or unnatural; I experience it as a sort of a natural pause, as if it’s waiting calmly for something reasonable. Getting someone properly trained in EMDR to teach you what this feels like is really helpful, but you might be able to find it yourself.

There’s a bit more to it: real EMDR training starts with finding, and programming into that deep layer, a “safe place” to go to in your mind; establishing a certain connection with what some call “your wise self”, so you can re-assess your situation and re-evaluate your responses without the triggering; and learning what happens to you, in particular, during the process, so you can self-treat with fewer problems and more success.

Other techniques of bilateral stimulation include the “butterfly hug.” Cross your arms so your hands rest on your opposite collarbones, and tap one side, then the other side. This feels very comforting. It’s not my go-to, because the nerves going through my elbows don’t like bending up that much.

Thigh tapping is widely taught in disaster- and war-related trauma recovery. It can be done sitting, standing, or lying down. Simply tap your legs, first one side, then the other, with the hand on that side. Left hand left leg, Right hhand right leg, back adn forth. The signal demands attention from the brain, which pulls itelf off of panic duty and gets back to processing information and sorting memories in a healthier way.

My physical therapist recently taught me the cross-body crawl. I can do this standing, sitting, or lying down on my back. Reach over with one hand and bring up the opposite knee, then switch sides, back and forth.

This does several things: it provides bilateral stimulation, which calms the panicky system down. It tones the core muscles, especially done while walking! It reminds the brain where the limbs are, which is kind of a huge deal with CRPS, which tends to muddle our brain’s map of our bodies. The cross-body crawl tops my current list of things I wish I wouldn’t do in public, because people look at me funny, but I’m going to do it anyway, because it’s so helpful to me.

I’m also able to focus on nutrition, physically the biggest player in the healing game. I made a green soup last night — Not Chik’n brand bouillon with all the green things I could find in the store that weren’t cabbage relatives (because they push down on my thyroid), and yesterday that was parsley, leeks, mature spinach, celery, and dandelion greens, plus carrots to smooth it all out. I cooked the rather harsh-smelling leeks in butter until the smell sweetened, then dumped everything but the spinach in and simmered for awhile, letting the minerals leach out into the broth. Then I cooked the spinach on top more briefly (so it wouldn’t get bitter) and threw it all in the blender.

As my friend said, “It’s like a chlorophyll bath.”

Meanwhile, as long as I persist in my meditative practice, the work on finding a home charges ahead. It’s a lasting puzzle to the linear part of my mind why an hour spent on meditation makes the other 3-4 functional hours I can squeeze out of the day ten times more effective. I’m gaspingly glad that it does, because it’s a heck of a job to find a safe place for this body.

This cascade of events has carved into my very bones the understanding that it’s meditation that will save me in the end. It’s the axis of my mundi, strange as that may seem to those who’ve witnessed any of my eventful life.

I feel the wings of angels stirring my hair now, and I can’t worry, only take the leap and trust that I’ll fly, rather than fall.

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3-4 solid tools for tough times

(If you’re looking for my housing-search info, go here for the latest with all the tables, and here for the one before that 🙂 )
I’ve often remarked that one of the really SPECIAL things about CRPS is the way it essentially “re-traumatizes” the brain: in many ways, it duplicates what happens to the brain when horrific things happen — car accidents, war, etc.
That’s so not right.
This is why we tend to be a leeeeeetle intense at times, and why those of us who survive it long-term become Jedi masters about managing how we appear to feel and how we manage how we really feel.
A key component, as many of you are well aware, is helping yourself find and develop the tools that let your brain process the endless hurt, integrate useful lessons, and release the bitterness, day by day by day. 
 
This is where a regular inner practice comes in handy. I’m sure there’s something most of y’all have got going, possibly related to CBT or DBT or mindfulness, for anxiety, grounding and self-calming; these are great tools. To strengthen yourself further and create more resiliency, try taking that to the next level in some way.
Here are some tools from my life and from survivor workshops and so forth. Individually, they’re amazing. Together, they’re mutually reinforcing and geometrically powerful. They are:
  • Free writing
  • Journaling (not the same thing at all)
  • Disciplined movement
  • Some kind of meditation
 

A. Free Writing:

1. Set a timer or page-count. If possible, use paper and pen rather than keyboard.
2. Once you start, just keep the pen moving forward, no crossings out or edits, just keep the pen moving forward. 
3. When the timer/page count is done, stop right there. It’s okay to finish the sentence, but stop.
> This does something important, which we don’t really have language for but which is absolutely primitive-brain-supportive, that helps de-sting one’s thoughts and experiences.
> Start as short or long as you think it would be successful to do, and go from there. Time spent doing free-writing is never wasted, but running around and art are good too.
> Walk away and do something physical or practical afterwards.
>> Take at least 2 hours before coming back for another round. The brain needs the integration-rest-time, for this to work.
> If you leave out any of these points, then you’re journalling, which is also great, but it’s a totally different strategy as far as the brain/mind/emotional landscape is concerned.
This technique is particularly useful after school, after a big incident when the feelings have calmed down but the mind is still recovering, or before starting a big project.
 

B. Journaling:

1. Put it outside the head and onto a physical medium.
That’s it.
> Journaling can be written, drawn, painted, danced (if filmed), sculpted, photographed, montaged, whatever. Out of the head and onto/into a physical medium.
> We journal for ourselves alone. The writing, pictures, even the dance footage, are not for showing. They might be shown later, after the period of life has passed, but that’s not the point. More commonly, they lay the groundwork for exponentially better art that’s made later.
> Keep them close, where they can be consulted by the one who did them. Nobody else is involved.
> Journaling exteriorizes and preserves our thoughts/feelings/subjectivity so they get less “gluey” and less scatty and become easier to handle.
> Looking over a period of life’s journals can be a great way to shine a Klieg Light of God on things, and free you up to make great changes quickly.
> It’s compost. Don’t expect it to be sweet or glorious, just let it compost. It pays off over time.
 

C. Disciplined movement

Of any sort: dance (Traditional, hip hop, jazz, modern, square, anything), t’ai chi, yoga, playing drums, gymnastics, long-distance running, group sports (plenty of opportunities for seeing both useful and silly ways to handle conflict), canoeing, sailing, etc.

Big grinning woman in spectacular Hawaiian ceremonial dress dancing with her arms
Photo: Joanna Poe in Honolulu
> This literally helps organize the brain, especially a growing brain, most especially that of an intelligent child.
> It also helps regulate neurotransmitters to a healthier balance.
> The body working under specific direction of the brain is enormously neuro-protective and re-balancing. Nothing else works half as well for the brain, the mind, the feelings, and the immune and digestive systems, as disciplined movement. Its value simply can’t be overstated.

D. Meditation

Of any of several kinds.
It seems most useful to have a couple of different kinds of meditation, so if you’re not up to one, you can do the other, and the benefits are mutually reinforcing.
1. “Still” meditation is mostly based on breathing with attention, and once that gets more natural, there are progressive layers of using attention & breathing to strengthen, stabilize, and regulate inner life and responses to outer events in life.
2. “Standing” and “Moving” meditations are often easier than still meditation when it’s harder to focus. The posture and/or movement provides a way into the meditative state.  Also, it qualifies as “disciplined movement.” Two-fer!
> Different methods of “still” meditation only become interesting once you’re generally pretty comfortable with sitting and breathing, and being able to put your attention on some place in your breathing path and just rest it there. (Feeling the air come in at the tip of your nose. Feel it come down to 2″ above your navel. Or rest your attention on any place in between. I love the feeling of it moving in my lungs, so that’s where I focus. My mom focuses on the tip of her nose. Just pick one and learn to rest your attention there — with a naturally-upwelling calm delight, yum! — while breathing.)
> Set a timer, and respect it — just like with Free Writing. For that period of time, all you have to do is the meditation, of whatever kind. It’s okay if it’s boring. It’s okay if it’s frightening — you’re actually safe and okay, and it’s okay to breathe through the feelings and let the time pass. The timer is your safety net. Remember that it takes about 5 minutes before and after meditating to transition, and that’s okay too.
> “Standing” and “Moving” meditations come in millions of styles and schools. These include yoga (hot, cold, slow, fast, many schools!), t’ai chi, qi gong (thousands of schools), judo (those who engage in judo are referred to as “playing” rather than “fighting” judo — it was my first martial art; surprised?), aikido, Shaolin — in fact, any martial art with a great teacher… and of course these come in styles relevant to the countries in which each particular school originated — Japan, Okinawa (my Dad’s karate style), China, Tibet, India, even France (savate) and Brazil (capoeira)… lots to choose from.
 
I’ve found that most more-detailed techniques of managing and clarifying thoughts, feelings, and decisions are basically variations or elaborations of these 4 core strategies. Play around and find what works for you.
 
I copied this from a comment I wrote on social media. So many of us need reminding, especially me. I’m so frightened and overwhelmed myself, I want to put this info where I can grab it quick.
Off to set a timer and do some t’ai chi.
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Decisions 2 – housing

Making a major decision, for someone with so little margin for error as a ragged, underfunded, spoony crip like me, means being able to answer all of these questions usefully:

  • What are ordinary needs and requirements, in this situation?
  • What are my particular needs and requirements they create?
  • What’s involved in an adequate trade-off?
  • What does success look like?
  • Are there any choices that meet my needs?
    If so…
  • What are the usual pitfalls?
  • What are my particular pitfalls?
  • How do I avoid or mitigate those?
  • How do I make this decision happen?
  • Red light signals and how to respond.
  • Yellow light signals and how to respond.
  • Gotchas and how to handle them.

So here I am, bringing my laborious and slow-motion decision-making process to finding a home I can afford and survive. Definitely a major decision.

This could be fun. Or gruesome. I’ll find out.

Let’s take a look at this through the decision-making stages I discussed in the previous article.

Developing good info about the problem to be solved

Housing is a crucial human need, especially beyond the 35th parallels.

Hang on, I need to come back. Everything went white for a minute there. (PTSD about facing homelessness and surviving criminally unsafe living situations? Who, me? Yup.)

The need has been around as long as we have, so the laws and practices are pretty predictable.

There are two normal fiscal options: renting and buying. There is one additional option available to residents of Vermont: buy the house from the state, which keeps the land but gives you the right to use the part your house is standing on.

There are three normal physical options: freestanding home, adjoined units (apartments, condos, townhomes/row-houses, etc.), or portable housing (mobile homes and travel trailers.)

Nonstandard options include buying an RV (made and insulated entirely with Isy-toxic materials) and living with a level of mobility and uncertainty I can’t even contemplate any more; or buying a boat (a.k.a. a mold factory) and living on that, which I can no longer afford in any way. I have to eschew them both.

Adult co-housing is a nonstandard option that has some appeal. A group of adults get together, develop a set of guidelines that (through a real-estate attorney) turn into a contract, find and buy a place together, and arrange themselves on the property according to their contract.

I’ve seen that go very well and I’ve seen that go very poorly, and quite a lot in the middle. It’s partly a matter of chemistry, but mostly a matter of writing a good, clear, solid contract and everyone agreeing to play by the rules and being able to live and let live.

All I need is a group of adults who are not only willing and wanting to do that, but have no toxic habits (like painting or baking), are willing to live gluten-free (except for cold food brought in from outside) and are willing and able to give up wifi and live off of hard-wired internet access only — no Bluetooth — and, most annoyingly, respect hard limits on how much time the cable box is on. Radiation off that thing gives me unconquerable insomnia in the other room from 30 feet away.

Let’s look at how the remaining options fit into the questions I need to answer.

What are ordinary needs and requirements, in this situation (home-hunting)?

Safe, dry, warm, with working doors/windows/plumbing/electrics; close enough to where the person needs to be.

Also, it has to be affordable.

What are my particular needs, and the requirements they create?

  • Mold free living, in this green land of upland lakes, swamps, and ubiquitous streams.
  • No petroleum-based volatile organic compounds — a category which includes regular paint, all low-cost and most mid-range flooring, and every conceivable kind of carpet.
  • Significant air pollution. For me, this centers around internal combustion engines, chemical processing, and fossil fuels. (For others, it’s woodsmoke that smells like doom.)
  • Loud noises and the vibrations that come with them. (You know how the nearest bully used to sneak up behind you, and then smack their palms over both your ears at once? Remember that feeling that your head just exploded, and hot shards jinked down your spine? Kind of like that, times about 1000. A vacuum cleaner suddenly turning on can knock me down. I used to live near railroad tracks; not an option now.)
  • Radiation of many kinds. This rules out being near power stations, overhead wires, hands-free phone technology (Bluetooth or cordless house phones) and (this is really limiting:) modern wireless signals, which feel like a blunt spear piercing me just below my xyphoid process and spinning barbed tails through my trunk while injecting molten metal up my spine and into my brain.

So much fun.

Believe it or not, after hearing part or all of this list, I’ve had people ask me, “How do you know that you need to avoid all that?” It’s not the words, it’s the tone. The implication is that all of this is somehow the product of a fevered imagination. If only it were!

I notice my responses, which are not subtle from the inside; I work out what particular exposure caused that response; and, intentionally or not, I get multiple exposures to each of these things because they’re everywhere, so I can test out the theory that a particular exposure causes a particular response.

It takes a special kind of person to go to the extraordinary effort to research substances that affect fragile systems and how, and claim to be that ill and be required to make all those compromises and spend all that money to avoid those materials, and give up so much because of it, without actually having their survival depend on it. That particular mental disorder is extremely rare — a lot rarer than invisible illnesses. Anyway, it’s one thing I definitely don’t have.

Examining the options

Rent or buy?

Good question. Let’s look at those from my point of view.

Renting

Rent tends to cost, month per month, about twice what home ownership does around here, even with all the taxes and fees figured in. Boggles my mind, but there it is. (Homeownership has loads of hidden expenses, but rarely do they double the cost month after month.)

Rentals are supposed to get repainted every two years or between each tenant, whichever is longer. That really sucks for me, because even low VOC paint makes me sick, goofy, nauseous, edgy, and unhappy for weeks.

The majority of rental units have carpeting, mostly cheap carpeting consisting mostly of petroleum derivatives, aggressively outgassing toxins all their lives while harboring mold and less savory things beyond the reach of steam cleaners.

Rental units in my price range are in high density housing (meaning there’s normally pollution, Wi-Fi, and noise completely beyond my control), and every single one that I’ve looked at has a mold issue – a solid, interlaminar set of colonies, usually in the kitchen and bathroom, often in the bedrooms, and if they’re in the bedrooms, they’re in the living rooms as well.

So much wrong.

In any case, unless I can find low income, high density living with non-toxic interior furnishings, nontoxic finishes, hardwood floors, no mold, good air, no pollution and no street noise (which would be fantastic for all concerned!), where all my neighbors have no power tools, dulcet voices, and no interest in using their cell phones every hour of every day (yeah, right), then… I probably have to think in terms of a freestanding house.

From the practical standpoint of having people to say hi to and help shoveling the stairs and the like, I would love to have close neighbors! It’s just that I need not to put myself in a position to be poisoned and tortured by regular people simply living their lives.

Buying

What with one thing and another, I realized a year and a half ago that I would have to focus on a freestanding house – despite all the upfront cost and work involved in that. It’s kind of like jumping off the deep end, an especially apt metaphor for a lifelong skin-diver, deep-water sailor, and former live-aboard “grotty yachtie” like me.

I’ve always had a pretty good instinct for real estate, which annoyed my father more than once – he kept ignoring my advice. The prices here only bobbled, they didn’t bubble; the overall trend has been gradually, consistently, steadily upward for a century or more.

This IS a region where it’s a good investment.

Buying requires good credit, but after LINK some work and time, that’s not a problem.

First-time homebuyers and low-income home buyers have special government programs that make it possible for them to get loans from banks by insuring those loans with the feds. Of course, the federal government has to be working for that to happen. (That could happen any month now. Maybe within a year?)

All I want is a clean, dry, safe-for-me 600-800 square-foot house on a couple acres of buffer zone for ~$135k inclusive, somewhere in the area of Easthampton to Heath to Montague to North Hadley, on a paved quiet road.

This is a reasonable price for a reasonable proposition. However, in two years of looking, it hasn’t turned up.

But I’ll show you what has turned up:

Century floodplain houses

How do you spell “moldfest”? It’s actually called “Sick Building Syndrome”, but either way, there’s a reason these places are cheap and still on the market.
[The century floodplain houses]

Foreclosures
First-time homebuyer loans will not cover these, nor should they. Foreclosures are the ultimate black-box proposition — you have no idea what’s in there, but a few observations and questions have taught me to interpret clues. I won’t bother you with photos, because these have since gone off the market and I’m not researching foreclosures any further:

  • Great little house in a gorgeous spot… with a cracked foundation — I mean a busted-right-open-and-let-the-critters-in foundation.
  • Current tenant dropped not one, but two trees across the driveway. Is that a hint? I was curiously disinclined to investigate.
  • The house has stood empty for over a year, and because of that, any characteristics that weren’t up to modern code are no longer grandfathered, but have to be corrected before moving in. This seems to add 30-120% to the effective price, and in one case I looked at, would have cost 3 times the purchase price just to turn it into a code-compliant property.
  • Extensive plumbing work is often required: in one case, the well went bad; in another, the septic system was toast; in many foreclosures, the sinks and toilets are smashed apart to discourage squatters — and add enormously to the repairs required of pipes, flooring, and walls affected, not to mention the porcelain.

[Several examples of what’s in my price range, with wry commentary]

[The total reno, with the great bones] I love this. I would LOVE to get my hands on this. Sadly, I’m now a formerly handy person. Holding the tools required, let alone breathing the dust and fumes involved, are sot even to be thought of. Breaks my heart, darn it! This would have been so much fun!

My needs and wants are very reasonable, but apparently, a place that embodies them doesn’t already exist.

It’s horrifying to contemplate, but I have to think about building my own. There are so many issues, both physical and fiscal, that it simply boggles the mind. Just to start with, how is a first time, low income home buyer going to qualify for a building loan, even where there is so much documentation regarding these special needs?

I’ve spoken at length with builders specializing in non-toxic homes, one company’s owners giving me what amounted to a three-hour workshop in materials, gotchas, and things to know and watch out for in regard to renovation and building. It doesn’t have to be much costlier, but it requires an enormous amount of project management on my part to keep costs down by researching and sourcing used or overstock fixtures and fittings, hardwood flooring, non-toxic and natural finishes (some of which I worked out how to use on my boat), and so forth.

I’ve come up with a couple of novel ways to simplify plumbing and electrics, which are in compliance with the current building codes. (The electrician and builders I’ve mentioned it to are intrigued and plan to keep my ideas in mind for the future. I find that encouraging.) That’s one way I’ve brought down some projected costs, although it depends on my being able to do certain physical work.

I’ve also researched the toxins, materials, labor, permitting, and costs involved in prefab vs. stick built (traditional) vs. log building here.

What I’ve learned about heating methods (toxicity, mold, fuels, weaknesses, etc.) would bore you to tears. I just have two words: steam heat.

While I have always imagined/dreamed of living in a hexagonal stick built house with lots of windows and two small wings, it turns out my family have always imagined I’d wind up in a little log cabin. It looks like they might be right.

What’s involved in an adequate trade-off?

I have to know where I can be flexible. This wiggle-room could make the difference between having a rational home and spinning off the face of the earth. (Two people who couldn’t find a home in time were found frozen to death yesterday. I’m trying not to think about that.)

There’s a little bit of slack in my needs, but not much.

Radiation (from heavy electrics, heavy electronics, cell phone towers too close, and wi-fi) is a no go.

VOCs that can be washed off, treated with pine and baking soda, or aired out in a few days would be fine.

Treatable mold would be fine, but, unfortunately, by the time it shows, there’s usually a well-established root system inside the wall and mitigation becomes the sort of iterative, messy, relentless, and ultimately unresolved nightmare that usually takes three scream queens and gallons of artificial blood to get across on the silver screen; respiratory struggles, immune failure and mental impairment aren’t nearly as dramatic on the outside as they are on the inside.

What does success look like?

I could be really flippant and say that success looks like an added hundred thousand dollars free and clear in my mortgage account. That would definitely put me in a price bracket that would allow me to have my log cabin, with the right fittings and finishes, in a safe clean area, with everything I need and nothing I don’t. Plus…

I used to dream of having a big enough property to put additional cabins on, and provide safe non-toxic living for friends who like small spaces, and maybe some glamping spots for the summer. I’ve already got 2 friends who’d love to sign that lease as of yesterday, and 3 more who’d love to think about it, and that all turned up in 2 conversations. There is clearly a market for safe, small, inexpensive housing, and it would be a good, benevolent, and sound investment. However, the start-up costs (more buildings, more slabs, more plumbing, more septic, etc.) are unthinkable for me. I just don’t have that.

This is where being poor is super frustrating. (Yes, I really do think this way … I’m more frustrated that I can’t help others than I am that finding a place for my own self is so hard.) I could so easily provide safe and sane housing for people who, like me, are fighting their environments all the time, and who would, if they could, much rather be using their energy to contribute to the world. And helping pay my mortgage. There is no downside.

There is no money for it, either.

Okay, onward.

What does success look like?

It looks manageably small, manageably affordable (or self-supporting — hello, cabins!), safe, clean, healthy, nontoxic, and warm.

I have a lot to do, and a lifespan truncated by probably 25-30 years. I’m genetically wired for my 90s, if I don’t smoke, which I don’t. So I’d better hustle!

In order to do my work (write my books, produce my pain-mitigating products, do live trainings on handling chronic pain and disability at home and at work, etc.) I need a home that doesn’t make things worse; Time alone will do that. It doesn’t need any more help from my living environment.

My success path is very, very narrow. I’m still not sure how to get there, but I have a few more interviews with specialist professionals ahead of me.

Are there any choices that meet my needs?

According to two years of market research, there is nothing already built that meets my needs in my price range.

I might have to make it myself, whether I like it or not, whether it’s easy (which it was never going to be) or not, whether there is any standard path to get me there, or whether I have to forge ahead and work the steps out one by one, going purely by what works for me – as I did with CRPS for so long, before clinical practice caught up with what I was doing.

I’m a very reasonable person. I’m just in a very unreasonable situation.

…Again.

I’m almost used to it. Sigh.

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