How I find my doctors


It’s not easy to find providers who can pay attention to the people in front of them and think their way out of a wet paper bag at the best of times, especially in the increasingly money-oriented and depersonalized model of care that grows and spreads out from the US like a bad rash.

When you’re looking for a specialist in a rare disease like CRPS, it’s even more interesting.

Sources for lists of providers


The online info-and-education site, RSDS.org, can send you a list of providers if you write to them and ask:
http://rsds.org/finding-a-crps-specialist/. More usefully, though, they also provide a list of links to medical-specialist licensing board sites, where you can find specialists in your region.

I checked these out.

American Board of Pain Medicine

Enter your city, state/province, and country in the fields provided; choose your target category (Anaesthesiology, Physical Medicine & Rehab, Neurology, Psychiatry, etc.) to find someone board-certified in that specialty; and click Find.
http://imis.abpm.org/abpmimis/abpm/directory.aspx

American Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehab

Same as above but with better instructions at the site.
https://members.aapmr.org/AAPMR/AAPMR_FINDER.aspx

American Academy of Pain Management

This very useful search tool includes a range of natural, ancillary, and supportive fields of care, not just physicians. It also allows you to set a distance, so you can expand or limit your commute as you see fit.
https://members.aapainmanage.org/aapmssa/censsacustlkup.query_page

Last but not least

Of course, if your insurance provider has a specific list of providers they’re willing to pay for, you may have to start with the list they give you. That simplifies the process initially.

Using online reviews rationally

Having found a list of specialists, I strongly recommend reading lots of reviews to find the one who suits you the best.

That will be different for different people, of course, because we have different bodies and we each have found that certain kinds of things work best for us; doctors, likewise, have different brains and are inclined to use a distinctive set of treatments, believing that that is what’s best.

So, if possible, we probably want to find a doctor whose approach and treatments bear some resemblance to our own.

Excellence

In addition to that, I recommend finding someone with over a decade of practice. There is no substitute for experience. It’s the only way that judgment — that subtle sense that takes in a lot of info subconsciously to arrive faster at a better result — can develop.

Excellence takes time. Extensive research on excellence indicates that 10 years is the functional minimum to develop it.

Personally, I tend to go for 25-30 years. I know that I require a collegial relationship with my doctor, and it takes an unusual degree of poise for most specialists to handle that gracefully. Also, I really need to be treated by someone who knows more than I do, and the longer I have this, the rarer that is….

Review sites

List of review sites I’ve used

Doctor review sites I’ve used include:

Yelp.com
ratemds.com
www.vitals.com
healthgrades.com
zocdoc.com

Using review sites rationally

Once I get a list of specialists, it’s pretty easy to screen out the majority on the first pass, on the basis of inexperience or irrelevant experience. Some of these review sites, like ratemds.com and healthgrades.com, show the education, experience, rewards, and publication highlights for each physician. (All of this is public info.) These data make a great screening tool.

I only need to do in-depth review reading for less than a dozen doctors, usually. I don’t feel comfortable with less than 4 review sites for each doc I take seriously. Each site has its own slant, so I prefer to triangulate on each provider’s patient relationships from different sites.

Caveat emptor: It’s important to look at review sites with my brain plugged in and working. We know that some reviews are posted malevolently, and that everyone — including doctors — has a bad day. We also know that everyone — including doctors — has got their blind spots. That’s fine. I’m looking for PATTERNS, not exceptional instances.

For instance, one memorable doc treated beautiful people very well, and everyone else very dismissively. When his attention was engaged (which, for him, was about looks), he was intelligent, appropriate, and did outstanding work; these are valuable traits. Therefore, I’d recommend him (with an explanation), to friends who meet the age/BMI criteria in his sweet spot, because good care is good care — but I’d emphatically warn against him to the rest!

Last time, I wound up choosing a doctor who had a super high proportion of “he listens to me” remarks, had over 30 years of practice, had started in psychiatry (which indicated a more human-oriented and less problem-oriented approach, I thought), and did charity work for pain in his own time. That turned out extremely well. I wish I could get him to move across the country now, because I hate having to start the search all over again.

Now that I’ve got all my links in one place, it’ll be a lot easier.

Recap of my process

1. Create a list of potential providers:


Choose an appropriate specialty, such as..

  • anaesthesiology (training is oriented towards meds and procedures)
  • physical medicine and rehab (training is oriented toward physiotherapy and mental discipline)
  • psychiatry (training is oriented toward neurochemistry and life habits)

Choose an appropriate level of experience,with 10 years as my recommended minimum.

Make a comprehensive list of possibilities in your commute distance, using one of the board-certification bodies above or the list your insurance company provides you with.

2. Narrow it down to what makes sense:


First, quick pass through the list: screen for appropriate specialty (you’d be amazed at what winds up in those lists) and experience.

Second pass through the list: Start looking at online reviews. Cross out those who do a great job of pissing off their patients. Again, you’d be amazed… Every single doc gets a certain number of “he treated me like crap! I’ve never been so insulted in my life!” remarks, so I don’t notice a few of those, but when they predominate, out that doctor goes.

Third pass through the list: I look at 3-4 sites containing online reviews for the surprisingly short list of names I’ve got left. Some reviews are cut-and-pasted across sites, so I count those only once. This is where a pattern of personalities and approaches comes across.

Final triangulation: These impressions are easy enough to check by looking at the doctor’s web presence — activities they’re involved in, published work, what they do in their spare time (I find doing disease-related charities more compelling than golf club or Rotarian memberships, for instance), and I’m quickly down to 1 or 2 practitioners.

From there it’s a very simple choice.

3. Pick one.

If it’s a hard choice, I’ll call the office and ask to talk to the nurse. The staff a doctor hires have an awful lot to do with my experience there, so, by the time I know the doc has met my other criteria, incompetent or stupid staff is a perfectly reasonable deal-breaker.

I’m willing and able to travel quite a distance for a good provider, and this makes it a lot easier for me to find one. I’m deeply indebted to my partner for being so willing and happy to do so much driving on my behalf. It makes an enormous difference, and I’m suitably grateful.

I hope you all can find the right doctor where you need one. There is simply no substitute for good and appropriate care.

Share this article:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Help

WordPress theme: Kippis 1.15