I’m sorry, Dave. I’m afraid I can’t do that.

Interesting metaphor for this, um, ratfink disease.

Interviewer:
HAL, you have an enormous responsibility on this mission, in many ways perhaps the greatest responsibility of any single mission element. You’re the brain and central nervous system of the ship…

Poole:
Unfortunately, that sounds a little like famous last words.

I had the pleasure of explaining CRPS to a doctor who isn’t mine, who really wanted to understand. After listening to me for 15 minutes nonstop, he summarized it perfectly.

He said, “It’s a bit like HAL, in 2001.”

I asked if I could borrow that.

I’ve culled movie quotes off the web and my CRPS compatriots can say how breathtakingly parallel they are. In no particular order:

Dr. Frank Poole:
… That would pretty well wrap it up as far as HAL was concerned, wouldn’t it?
Dave Bowman:
Well, we’d be in very serious trouble.
Frank Poole:
We would, wouldn’t we. What the hell could we do?
Dave Bowman: [sigh]
Well, we wouldn’t have too many alternatives.
Frank Poole:
I don’t think we’d have any alternatives. There isn’t a single aspect of ship operations that isn’t under his control.

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is the central nervous system in a nutshell.

Dave Bowman:
All right, HAL; I’ll go in through the emergency airlock.
HAL:
Without your space helmet, Dave, you’re going to find that rather difficult.
Dave Bowman:
HAL, I won’t argue with you any more! Open the doors!
HAL:
Dave, this conversation can serve no purpose anymore. Goodbye.

We’ve all had that happen!

HAL:
Just what do you think you’re doing, Dave?

Um, trying to survive?

[Regarding an apparent problem which HAL itself falsified]
HAL:
It can only be attributable to human error.

Swine. YOU did this, CRPS!

HAL:
I know I’ve made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal. I’ve still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission. And I want to help you.

This reminds me of the “you have CRPS because you think wrong” school of thought. Right… thanks for the help… next time, suck the oxygen out of my atmosphere; that’d be a real help.

Dave Bowman:
Hello, HAL. Do you read me, HAL?
HAL:
Affirmative, Dave. I read you.
Dave Bowman:
Open the pod bay doors, HAL.
HAL:
I’m sorry, Dave. I’m afraid I can’t do that.

Because sometimes this system seems to get input, but it just won’t generate any output.

On providers trying to assess from outside:

Mission Controller:
X-ray delta one, this is Mission Control. Roger your two-zero-one-three. Sorry you fellows are having a bit of trouble. We are reviewing telemetric information in our mission simulator and will advise.

On trying different treatments:

Dr. Frank Poole:
Let’s see, king… anyway, Queen takes Pawn. Okay.
HAL:
Bishop takes Knight’s Pawn.
Frank Poole:
Huh, lousy move. Um, Rook to King 1.
HAL:
I’m sorry, Frank, I think you missed it. Queen to Bishop 3, Bishop takes Queen, Knight takes Bishop. Mate.
Frank Poole:
Huh. Yeah, it looks like you’re right. I resign.
HAL:
Thank you for a very enjoyable game.
Frank Poole:
Yeah, thank you.

Yeah, thank you. Sooooooo much.
me-fingers-2up

This movie says everything you need to know about what it takes to deal with this disease:

  • It’s hard. Breathtakingly hard.
  • We don’t really know where it came from, and we really don’t understand why.
  • It’s crazy, and it does its best to make us crazy — and those around us.
  • It takes away more than we knew we had to lose.
  • We have to out-think it, even though it seems to stay 3 steps ahead of us.
  • Persistence — unvarnished, absolute, bloody-minded persistence — is key. Even when you feel you can’t, take a breath and make the next move. Keep working.
  • It seems impossible. It’s a harrowing thing to face, and has killed so many of us, in different ways.
  • It sabotages our efforts to improve things.
  • It’s worse than we could have imagined.

It really is like HAL.

So … Let’s remember who won.

Now a bit of Youtube for dessert, and a hopeful image for all in search of remission. Let’s pop those modules, one by one.

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Acute pain, chronic brain, and naming this ratfink disease

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome is the latest in a long line of names for this disease. Some of the older names have been recast to cover aspects of it, or versions of it, or special cases, and of course there are overpaid people who argue about it intensely. I’m going to go out on a limb and list a few sometime-names, sorta-names, and related-names to go on with:

  • Complex Regional Pain Syndrome
    Until recently, there were two subtypes: Type 1 had no visible nerve damage, Type 2 did. However, with chronic CRPS, there is extensive and pervasive nerve damage, and it makes no difference in treatment after the acute stage, so this subtyping is widely considered irrelevant.
  • Sudeck’s atrophy
    No longer used; atrophy of bone and muscle is really symptomatic, and not always present.
  • Causalgia
    No longer used, except as an old name for CRPS type 2.
  • Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy
    Used by old-timers and sometimes for CRPS type 1, although CRPS-1 is not necessarily maintained by the sympathetic nervous system.
  • Algodystrophy
    More often used in Europe; also, neuroalgodystrophy. Problematic because it implies that this is the result of autosuggestion. I know I could not have made this up in a million years; moreover, extensive analyses of the literature show that there is simply no truth to that.
  • Neurodystrophy
    More often used in Europe. It’s a perfectly good name, but not the one that the IISP paid a bunch of specialists to come up with)
  • Reflex neurovascular dystrophy
    RND; no longer used, because it only addresses vascular changes, not neurology or systemic issues.
  • Shoulder-hand syndrome
    No longer used, except to refer to upper-body chronic neuropathic pain while dodging a CRPS diagnosis.
  • Peripheral trophoneurosis
    Good one, eh? No longer used, both because it may spread out of the periphery, and it’s not about neurosis. See “algodystrophy” above.

For more on comparative naming and different nations’ approaches over the years, check out the RSD Canada site.

A certain amount of acute CRPS does clear up (or go into remission) before it’s even diagnosed. Since it can take years to get diagnosed, there’s not a good way of figuring out what those numbers might be. Even after diagnosis, acute CRPS can go into full remission and never show up again, before it becomes the ground-in form of trouble I call chronic CRPS.

In its chronic form, CRPS is a disease of dysregulation — of everything being thrown off balance. Our efforts to push back against any given part of that are quite likely to throw our systems off balance in some other way.

The body doesn’t balance simply, like a seesaw; it dances in 4-D homeostasis, which I’ve explained here. It’s a bit more like this:
Trapeze_artists_trimmed
Now imagine pushing one of those trapeze bars the wrong way.

Adjustments need to be carefully incremental in order not to distort the system further, but often need to be done quickly because the situation is so horrible to be in.

It’s a conundrum.
Sketch of brain, with bits falling off and popping out, and a bandaid over the worst
Personally, I’d like to have different names for acute and chronic CRPS. Here’s why:

Acute CRPS is all about the pain, with swelling and dystonia and circulatory high-jinks playing second fiddle. With acute CRPS, good results are consistently found with vitamin C (500 mg twice or three times daily is the usual dose range) and also with activity plus pain control, both quite aggressive.

Apart from that, therapies vary widely as to what will work with whom, but chances of remission in the first few months are very good, and in the first few years are still comparatively good.

After that, the whole situation changes.

With chronic CRPS, you realize that you have to find a way to live around the pain because so many other things are going wrong, life itself has to take center stage at some point, and pain has to take its turn in the wings.

Once the brain plasticity has gotten going, it’s no longer just a pain disease, but a disease of dysregulation, as the signals change and the body’s responses to the signals change and the brain’s ability to even recognize appropriate responses to temperature, circulation demands, sensation, perception, and so forth, all slide downhill.
Bosch_painting_of_Hell_(582x800)
In acute CRPS, having the word “pain” in the name is absolutely appropriate, because that must be addressed to let the brain reboot and get back to normal.

In chronic CRPS, pain often remains a huge part of it, but the central brain-changes are what creates and sustains the disease state. Pain is, clinically speaking, a ghastly distraction.

It’s a key symptom, a good guide (since muscle weakness, sweat and circulatory changes all tend to track to it at least some of the time), but it is not the driving force of the disease. The brain changes are.
poison_skull
Pain is terribly seductive to researchers, because people who don’t have chronic CRPS think they “get it” about pain (hah!) and, since that’s easier to relate to than the word “complex,” let alone the hopelessly misunderstood terms “regional” and “syndrome”, what they focus on is the pain.

The real problem is the brain, not the pain.

In my private internal world of reason and order, chronic CRPS is actually known as Complex Neuro-plastic Dysregulation, CND.

My eyes make words out of letter groups, usually just by adding a vowel. What comes to mind for me is, if you don’t win at CR[a]PS, you get C[a]ND.
craps-tshirt-front
Makes all kinds of sense to me 🙂

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