Putting together the team


I saw  my counselor this morning and told her I was thinking of running the marathon. She waited for me to go on, then said, “Wait, you’re not laughing. You’re serious!”

I waved a hand generously and said, “Take a moment to have your reaction…”

It was priceless.

After talking it over a bit, she began to get behind it, rather  breathlessly but with real glee.

I saw my PT just now, for our first conversation since his rather cryptic reply to my email. He doubled my treadmill time (up to 10 minutes from 5), and said without preamble, in his cooly unflappable way, “That marathon idea of yours? It’s going to be slow, it’s going to be hard work, but I think we can do it. It’s a good goal.”

I nearly burst with relief and delight.

He set a 5-mile limit on my exercise over the coming 2 weeks of my vacation, then checked and said, “You’re  going to come back and say, ‘He-e-ey, I did 15!”

Finally… a PT I don’t have to train.

Last, I saw my rheumatologist, who laughed in a pleased fashion and said, “I’m glad you’ve got a good PT for this. That makes my job a lot easier.” Didn’t turn a hair.

I’m seeing my primary care doc and my pain doc on Thursday.  As for data (I am a geek; gotta have data!) I have current baseline levels for all basic chemistries, immune globulins, and a complete blood count, plus vitamin C and D. I have cortisol reports from when I was in adrenal exhaustion.

I’d like a baseline cortisol test now, and talk over what other stress/adaptation/compensation markers we could be tracking and how often.

I might have to shop around to different labs to keep in budget, if insurance can’t be persuaded to cover the lab-based data collection, or if I can’t get it covered some other way.

I’m dead serious about not hurting myself. I’m also dead serious about going for this. In any case,  we might as well collect data, so if nothing else, we’ll have one damn good case study to publish.

See you on the trails.

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2 Replies to “Putting together the team”

    1. Pshaw :#)

      I’m elated over how positive they are. One advantage of having my care at a large, well-regarded institution like Keck/USC is that being unusual is not that unusual.

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